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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Also Known As: California Radiation Laboratory
State: California
Location: Livermore
Time Period: 1950-present
Facility Type: Department of Energy
 
Facility Description:
The Atomic Energy Commission established the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a facility for nuclear weapons research. The Department of Energy (DOE) owns the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Main Site and Site 300; DOE and the University of California jointly operate the sites. The Main Site was initially used as a flight training base and an engine overhaul facility. Transition from naval operations to scientific research began in 1950, when the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) authorized construction of a materials-testing accelerator site. The AEC established the University of California Radiation Laboratory, Livermore Site (the predecessor of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) as a facility for nuclear weapons research. The Department of Energy purchased Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Site 300 from local ranchers in the 1950s for use as a remote high-explosives testing facility.
 
Throughout the course of its operations, the potential for beryllium exposure existed at this site, due to beryllium use, residual contamination, and decontamination activities.
 
Listing:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is listed as a Department of Energy (DOE) site under the EEOICPA. The special Exposure Cohort dates for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are 1950-1973.
 
Special Exposure Cohort (SEC) Classes:
Employees of the Department of Energy (DOE), its predecessor agencies, and DOE contractors or subcontractors who were monitored for radiation exposure while working at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from January 1, 1950, through December 31, 1973, for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days or in combination with work days within the parameters established for one or more other classes of employees in the SEC
 
All employees of the Department of Energy, its predecessor agencies, and their contractors and subcontractors who worked at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California from January 1, 1950 through December 31, 1973, for a number of work days aggregating at least 250 work days, occurring either solely under this employment or in combination with work days within the parameters established for one or more other classes of employees in the SEC
 
Compensation:
As of 07/26/2015, the total compensation paid under Parts B and E of the EEOICPA, including medical compensation, for workers suffering from the effects of having worked at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is $221,377,238.
 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workers:
If you or your parent worked at this or any other DOE or AWE facility and became ill, you may be entitled to compensation of up to $400K plus medical benefits from the US Department of Labor. Call EEOICPA Counsel Hugh Stephens at 1-855-EEOICPA (336-4272) or fill out the form to the right, whether or not you have already filed a claim and even if your claim has been accepted or denied.
 
We can help with all OWCP (Federal Workers Compensation) claims, impairments, wage loss and health care. 2495 Main Street, Suite 442 Buffalo, NY.
 
Videos:
Other aspects of the Lawrence Livermore Nuclear Laboratory are discussed below:
 

 
 SITE DESCRIPTION (NIOSH Site Profile)
LLNL was founded in 1952 on the site of a closed U.S. Naval Air Station. It was known originally as the University of California Radiation Laboratory at Livermore then later as the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. LLNL consists of two sites, the main Laboratory site, which is in a densely 2 2populated 1.5-mi area in Livermore, California, and the 11-mi Explosive Test Site near Tracy, California, which is also known as Site 300.
 
In the beginning, the Laboratory’s single mission dealt with thermonuclear weapons development. Over the years, the mission expanded to include diverse scientific and engineering research activities. These activities, not all of which were related to the development of nuclear weapons have included the following (DOE 1992):
 

  •  Research, development, and test of the nuclear weapons life cycle and related tasks
  •  Strategic defense research emphasizing kinetic- and directed-energy weapons
  •  Arms control and treaty verification technology
  • Inertial confinement fusion for weapons physics research and for civilian energy applications
  • Atomic vapor laser isotope separation for defense and commercial applications
  • Magnetic fusion, including leadership of the U.S. effort on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor
  • Other energy research in basic energy sciences, atmospheric sciences, fossil energy, and commercial nuclear waste
  • Biological, ecological, atmospheric, and geophysical sciences relevant to weapons, energy, health, and environmental issues, including assessment and guidance in the event of accidents and other emergencies
  • Charged-particle beam and free-electron laser research for defense and energy applications
  • Advanced laser and optical technology for military and civilian applications
  • Support of the U.S. intelligence community, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and other Federal agencies
  • Participation in the nationally directed initiative to understand the human genome at the molecular leve

 
Table 2-1 provides a general description of LLNL buildings and activities. In 1966, building numbers were changed; some of these changes are cross-referenced in the table. In addition, the Site 300buildings changed from the 300 series to the 800 series (e.g., 301 changed to 801). Attachment A provides a complete cross reference from the old to the current building numbers, with the exception of the 300 to 800 change. Unless noted otherwise, this document uses the current building numbers.
 
Table 2-1. Summary of major buildings and activities.

Old building Current building
numbers numbers Description
101, 102, 106, 221, 222, 223, 224, Chemistry: Various radioactive materials including Co-60, fission products,
117, 118, 147, 232, 233, 234, 167, enriched uranium, depleted uranium, natural uranium, U-233, Cm-244,
176, 192 168, 169 Pu-239, Am-241, others
153, 154, 157, 171, 173, 174, 175, Physics: Accelerators, various activation products, H-3, others
173, 180, 194 176, 177, 194, 210,
212, 241, 243, 421, 435
103, 114, 125, 215, 243, 253, 321, Lab services: Various radioactive materials
127, 174, 175 419, 514,
110 261 Critical Test Facility
115 327 Radiography
121 412 Hot cells: High beta waste, Sr-90
170 131 Weapons engineering
171 332 Metallurgical chemistry: Also known as Plutonium Facility
172 331 Gaseous Chemistry: Also known as Tritium Facility
182 162, 165, 166 Laboratory Services: 55 Ci Co-60 (1958)
190 251 Chemistry Heavy Elements Facility: Cm-244, Am-241, U-233, Pu-239,
others
193 281 Livermore Pool Type Reactor (LPTR)
S ite 300 Explosives Testing: Linear accelerators, depleted uranium, H-3,
radiography

 
 MAJOR FACILITIES DESCRIPTIONS AND ACTIVITIES
This section discusses activities in the various buildings at the LLNL main site and Site 300. The discussion for each of the buildings or building complexes provides information on the general nature of activities at that facility. Figure 2-2 is a map of the main site, and Figure 2-3 is a map of Site 300. Table 2-2 summarizes building activities and radionuclides that workers could have encountered. Section 2.3.1 describes the buildings, Section 2.3.2 describes known soil contamination in the Southeast Quadrant of the main site, Section 2.3.3 describes Site 300, and Section 2.3.4 describes personnel involvement in nuclear weapons testing.
 
This discussion is not intended as a complete radiological history, but rather as a discussion to familiarize dose reconstructors with the types and variety of activities that have occurred at LLNL. Other sections of the LLNL Site Profile provide information about radiological conditions at various facilities throughout the LLNL site in relation to external and internal dosimetry as well as environmental occupational dose.
 
Buildings (Main Site)
Building 121
The Test Program facility, Building 121, is in the southwest quadrant of the LLNL site. Operations in this facility have included the use of X-ray and electron generators, high-voltage pulsers, lasers, mechanical and electronic equipment, and use of radioactive and toxic materials to perform measurements for the development of diagnostic techniques for interpretation of experiments on nuclear weapons.
 
Other operations included laser irradiation of toxic materials, a Febetron electron beam to develop diagnostic systems for gathering data from nuclear tests, measurement of leakage current on esistance of photoconductive detectors when illuminated by laser light, concurrent operation of multiple Class III and IV lasers, a ruby laser, a mode-locked flash lamp pumped dye laser, and a nitrogen laser with dye cell for the purpose of pico- and nanosecond pulse generation used for streak camera calibrations.
 
This facility also housed the Pulsed Calibration Laboratory, Hyjacs X-ray Laboratory, and Vacuum Barrier Permeation Leak Testing Laboratory (DOE 1992).
 
Building 131
The Building 131 complex is a large office and laboratory facility housing both the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Divisions. The shops and laboratories have supported weapons testing and assembly as well as microelectronic and microfabrication work. In addition, the facility has a high bay containing a large laboratory and shop operation as well as a Materials Management Vault that has stored controlled materials to support the weapons testing program. The use of radiation sources has been limited primarily to the high bay area, and sealed sources or radioactive material in solid form has been used. Small antistatic blowers containing sealed sources have been used in the microfabrication laboratories. Use of a hood or glovebox enclosure has been required for operations that could potentially expose workers (DOE 1992). Nondestructive use of depleted uranium was reported in the documentation.
 

Table 2-2. Individual building activities and associated radionuclides.

Current buildinga (old #) # Building activity Radionuclides
131 Mechanical & Engineering Divisions, Th-232, U-234, U-235, U-238
Weapons
132 Analytical & Nuclear Chemistry Labs; H-3, Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-137, Th-228, Th-230, Th-232, U-234, U-235, U-238,
forensic Sciences Center Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-241
151 Isotope Sciences, Environmental H-3, C-14, Na-22, corrosion products, mixed fission products, transuranics,
Services Lab uranium, plutonium, thorium
162, 165, 166 Lab services 55 Ci Co-60 source (1958)
(182A-E)
167, 168, 169 Chemistry Various radioactive materials including Co-60, fissions products, enriched
uranium, natural uranium, U-233, Cm-244, Am-241, others
171 Physics: Accelerators Various activation products, H-3, others
173 Physics: Accelerators Various activation products, H-3, others
174 Physics: Accelerators Various activation products, H-3, others
175 U-AVLIS U-234, U-235, U-238
176 Physics: Accelerators Various activation products, H-3, others
177 U-AVLIS U-234, U-235, U-238
179 U-234, U-235, U-238
194 LINAC N-13, O-15, Na-22, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238
210 Physics: Accelerators Various activation products, H-3, others
212 Physics and Space (rotating target H-3
neutron source)
215 Lab services Various radioactive materials not specified
221 Chemistry Various radioactive materials including Co-60, fissions products, enriched
uranium, natural uranium, U-233, Cm-244, Am-241, others
222 Chemistry H-3, C-14, Co-60, Ni-63, Th-232, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-238, Cm-244,
Am-241, fission products, others
223 Chemistry Co-60, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241, Am-243,
Cm-244, fission products, others
224 Chemistry Various radioactive materials including Co-60, fissions products, enriched
uranium, natural uranium, U-233, Cm-244, Am-241, others
226 H-3, U-238
227 U-234, U-235, U-238
231 Safeguards and engineering The-232, U-234, U-235, U-238
232 Chemistry Various radioactive materials including Co-60, fissions products, enriched
uranium, natural uranium, U-233, Cm-244, Am-241, others
233 Chemistry Various radioactive materials including Co-60, fissions products, enriched
uranium, natural uranium, U-233, Cm-244, Am-241, others
234 Chemistry Various radioactive materials including Co-60, fissions products, enriched
uranium, natural uranium, U-233, Cm-244, Am-241, others
235 Characterization studies and ion beam Th-232, U-234, U-235, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-241
experiments
241 Physics: Accelerators H-3, C-14, P-32, Th-232, U-234, U-235, U-238, various activation products
243 Lab services Various radioactive materials not specified
251 Heavy Element Facility U-233, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-243, Am-241, Cm-243, Cm-244, Cm-248, Cf-252
(190)
253 Labs and counting rooms H-3, C14, P-32, Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Bi-214, Po-218, Ra-226, Th-230, U-234,
U-235, U-238, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-241
254 Bioassays and analytical services H-3, C14, P-32, P-33, S-35, Sr-90, Y-90, I-125, Po-209, Ra-226, Th-230,
U-232, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Np-237, Np-239, Pu-238, Pu-239,
Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-242, Cm-244, Cf-249, Cf-252
255 Calibration laboratory H-3, C14, P-32, S-35, Sr-90, Y-90, I-125, I-131, Th-230, Th-232, U-233,
U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Np-237, Np-239, Pu-239, Pu-242, Am-241,
Am-243, Cm-242, Cm-244, Cf-252
261 Critical test facility U-235, Pu-239
(110)
281 Reactor; tracer and dissolution studies During reactor operations, fission and activation products. Later, trace
(193) amounts of various radionuclides.
282 Neutrino detection experiments H-3
292 Residual contamination rotating target H-3
neutron source

Table 2-2 (Continued). Site activities by building and associated radionuclides.

Current building # a (old #) Building activity Radionuclides
298 Laser fusion program H-3, U-234, U-235, U-238
321A Milling and shaping U-234, U-235, U-238
321B Milling and shaping U-234, U-235, U-238
321C Milling, machining and shaping U-234, U-235, U-238
322 Maintenance and engineering U-234, U-235, U-238
327 Maintenance and engineering; U-234, U-235, U-238
(115) radiography
331 Gaseous chemistry; Tritium Facility H-3 (HT, HTO), U-238
(172)
332 Metallurgical chemistry; Plutonium Pu-239, transuranics
(171) Facility
341 Lasers Directorate U-234, U-235, U-238
361 Research and development H-3, C-14, P-32, P-33, S-35
362 Research and development H-3, C-14
363 Research and development H-3, C-14
364 Research and development H-3, C-14, P-32
365 Research and development H-3, C-14
366 Research and development H-3, P-32, P-33
377 Research and development H-3, P-32, Ni-63
378 Co-57, Co-60, Sr-85, Cd-109, Cs-134, Cs-137, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-238,
Pu-236, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-242, Pu-244, Np-237, Am-241, Am-243
381 H-3
391 H-3
412 (121) Hot cells: High beta waste Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90
421 Physics: Accelerators Various activation products, H-3, others
435 Physics: Accelerators Various activation products, H-3, others
491, 492, 493, 494 U-AVLIS U-238
513 Waste processing H-3, C-14, P-32, K-40, Mn-54, Co-57, Co-60, Sr-90, Nb-95, Zr-95, Ru-106,
I-125, I-131, Ba-133, Cs-134, Cs-137, Cs-138, Ce-141, Ce-144, Eu-152,
Eu-154, Eu-155, Tl-206, Bi-212, Bi-214, Pb-210, Pb-212, Pb-214, Ra-223,
Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-228, Pa-231, Th-226, Th-227, Th-228, Th-232, Th-234,
U-233, U-234, U-235, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242,
Am-241, Cm-244, Cf-249
514 Waste processing H-3, Be-7, C-14, Na-22, P-32, S-35, K-40, Sc-46, Cr-51, Fe-55, Mn-54, Co-56,
Co-57, Co-58, Co-60, Ni-63, Zn-65, Y-88, Sr-89, Sr-90, Nb-94, Nb-95, Zr-95,
Ru-103, Ru-106, Cd-109, Sb-125, I-125, I-131, Ba-133, Cs-134, Cs-137,
Ce-139, Ce-141, Ce-144, Gd-148, Pm-147, Sm-151, Eu-152, Eu-154, Eu-155,
Hf-172, Lu-173, Lu-174, W-185, Po-209, Po-210, Bi-207, Bi-210, Pb-210,
Ra-226, Th-228, Th-229, Th-230, Th-232, U-232, U-233, U-234, U-235,
U-236, U-237, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Pu-244,
Np-237, Np-239, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-244, Cf-249
514 Tank Farm Waste processing H-3, Be-7, C-14, Na-22, P-32, P-33, S-35, K-40, Sc-46, Cr-51, Fe-55, Fe-59,
Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, Co-60, Ni-59, Ni-63, Zn-65, Y-88, Y-91, Sr-90,
Nb-95, Mo-99, Tc-99, Ru-103, Ru-106, Cd-109, Sn-113, Ag-110m, I-125,
I-131, Sb-110m, Sb-124, Sb-125, Te-132, Ba-133, Ba-140, Cs-134, Cs-136,
Cs-137, La-140, Ce-139, Ce-141, Ce-144, Nd-147, Pm-147, Gd-148, Sm-151,
Eu-152, Eu-154, Eu-155, Eu-156, Tb-160, Hf-172, Hf-181, Lu-173, Lu-174,
W-185, Au-195, Hg-203, Bi-207, Bi-210, Po-209, Po-210, Pb-210, Ra-226,
Pa-233, Th-228, Th-229, Th-230, Th-232, U-232, U-233, U-234, U-235,
U-236, U-237, U-238, Pu-236, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242,
Pu-244, Np-237, Np-239, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-244, Cf-249
612 Waste storage and repackaging H-3, Be-7, C-14, Na-22, P-32, P-33, S-35, Cl-36, K-40, Sc-46, Cr-51, Fe-55,
Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, Co-58, Co-60, Ni-63, Zn-65, Se-75, Y-88, Y-91, Sr-85,
Sr-89, Sr-90, Kr-85, Nb-94, Nb-95, Zr-90, Zr-95, Mo-99, Tc-99, Rh-102,
Rh-103, Rh-103m, Ru-106, Cd-109, Cd-115, Ag-110m, I-125, I-131, Sb-124,
Sb-125, Ba-133, Ba-140, Cs-134, Cs-137, Ce-139, Ce-141, Ce-144, Nd-147,
Pm-147, Pm-151, Sm-151, Gd-146, Gd-148, Eu-149, Eu-152, Eu-154,
Eu-155, Eu-156, Tb-160, Hf-172, Lu-173, Lu-174, Ta-182, W-185, Ir-192,
Au-195, Pt-195m, Hg-203, Bi-207, Bi-210, Po-209, Po-210, Pb-210, Ra-223,
Ra-226, Th-228, Th-229, Th-230, Th-232, Th-234, U-232, U-233, U-234,
U-235, U-237, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Pu-244,
Np-237, Np-239, Am-241, Am-242, Am-242m, Am-243, Am-244, Cm-244,
Cf-249, Cf-250

Table 2-2 (Continued). Site activities by building and associated radionuclides.

Current building # a (old #) Building activity Radionuclides
612 Yard Waste storage H-3, C-14, P-32, S-35, K-40, Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-57, Co-60, Ni-59, Ni-63,
Se-75, Sr-90, Nb-95, Tc-99, Sb-125, Cs-134, Cs-137, Ce-144, Pm-147,
Sm-151, Eu-152, Eu-154, Eu-155, Bi-207, Bi-214, Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228,
Th-230, Th-232, Th-234, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239,
Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Pu-244, Np-239, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243,
CM-243, Cm-244, Cm-253
625 Waste operations H-3, C-14, P-32, K-40, Mn-54, Co-57, Co-60, Y-88, Sr-90, Zr-95, Ru-106,
Cd-109, Sb-125, Ba-133, Cs-134, Cs-137, Ce-141, Ce-144, Eu-152, Eu-154,
Eu-155, Bi-214, Pb-212, Pb-214, Pa-231, Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, Th-230,
Th-232, Th-234, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-238, U-239, Pu-238, Pu-239,
Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Np-237, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-243, Cm-244,
Cm-253
2561 U-234, U-238
Site 300 – Explosive s testing: linear accelerators, depleted u ranium, H-3, radiography.
801 Flash X-ray (FXR) linear accelerator H-3, N-13, Ar-41, U-234, U-235, U-238
810A U-234, U-235, U-238
810B U-234, U-235, U-238
827 Industrial radiography (portable X-ray Radionuclides not specified
machines)
823 Portable 9-MV Varian accelerator Radionuclides not specified
850 H-3, U-234, U-235, U-238
851 100-MeV LINAC H-3, N-13, O-15, Ar-41, U-234, U-235, U-238
865 Advanced Test Accelerator Various activation products
300 Pit 7 H-3
300 Well 8 Spring H-3

a. Source: LLNL (2005b).

 
Building 132
Building 132 provides office and laboratory space for a range of activities including the Directorate Offices for Chemistry and Materials Sciences; laboratories in the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division and the Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division; and Nonproliferation Arms Control and International Security Directorate Forensic Sciences Center offices and laboratories. The facility consists of the Defense Program Research Facility (132N) and the Nuclear Test Technology Complex (132S).
 

Radiological activities have been limited and included operations associated with the use of X-ray generators, electron beam generators, laser equipment, and sealed radioactive sources (DOE 1992).

 

Building 151
Building 151 houses the Isotope Sciences Division, which applies nuclear and isotope sciences to a wide range of problems including stockpile stewardship, nonproliferation, safeguard technologies, forensic science, and waste characterization and analysis. In addition, Building 151 contains the Chemistry and Materials Sciences Environmental Services laboratory where samples of waste streams and environmental media (air, water, soil, etc.) have been analyzed for their radionuclide content.

 

Buildings 175 and 177
Buildings 175 and 177 were part of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) program affiliated with the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). In June 1999, USEC suspended further development of the U-AVLIS technology. Building 175 is sometimes referred to as the MARS Facility (for Mirror Advanced Reactor System), which used an electron beam to vaporize natural or depleted uranium for evaluation of ion extraction, source development, and material handling subsystems.

 
Building 177 underwent decontamination and decommissioning in early 2002, and the sampling system was removed.
 

Building 190
Building 190 is operated by the Physics Department and has included a 10-MV tandem accelerator laboratory, accelerator mass spectrometry, and other accelerator uses (DOE 1992).

 

Building 193
The Livermore Pool Type Reactor was operated from Building 193 from 1957 to 1980.

 

Building 194
Building 194 is operated by N-Division for the Physics and Space Technology Directorate (formerly the Physical Sciences Directorate). The facility has included a high-energy (100 MeV) linear accelerator (LINAC) and research laboratories. The accelerator beam has produced small quantities of short-lived air activation products.

 

Building 212
Building 212 is administered by the Physics and Space Technology Directorate for miscellaneous physics experiments. Historically, the building housed a Cockcroft Walton accelerator and a 90-inch cyclotron. Experiments include the use of uranium, plutonium, and tritium. Radionuclide emissions are a result of contamination from past operations of the rotating target neutron source, which is no longer in operation.

 
Building 222 Complex
The Building 222 Complex in the southwest quadrant of the LLNL at the Livermore site consists of nine buildings (221 through 229) and several trailers. The complex includes chemical laboratories, offices, and machining and storage facilities. The wide range of work performed here includes the bench-scale synthesis and testing of chemical compounds, intralaboratory and consulting services, chemical analysis, bench-scale polymers and composite technology development, and other special bench-scale research and development projects (DOE 1992).
 
The chemistry facility, Building 222, is the main facility for the study of analytical and physical chemistry at LLNL. Buildings 224 and 226 are used for environmental analytical work. Building 225 activities have included energy research, surface science, and other similar bench-scale research. Building 227 has provided a facility for polymer research and work associated with LLNL intelligence and treaty verification support. Building 228 is the waste retention system for Building 226. Building 229 has stored beryllium hydride.
 

The hazards associated with the Building 222 Complex include handling small quantities of hazardous materials involved in research and development activities. These include radioactive materials, laser dyes, high explosives, solvents, inorganic acids, bases and salts, organic compounds, halogens, organometallics, and inorganic compounds (DOE 1992).

 

Building 231
The Development and Assembly Facility, Building 231, is a large experimental, manufacturing, assembly, test, and materials-handling facility in the southwestern quadrant of the site. Building 231 houses research and development activities conducted by Chemistry and Materials Science (Materials Division), Engineering (Engineering Sciences, Materials Fabrication, Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Test Engineering, and Weapons Engineering Divisions), Safeguards and Security (Materials Management Division), and Special Projects Program (J Division). Management oversight for Building 231 is provided by the Engineering Directorate through Engineering Sciences Division. Small amounts of depleted uranium have been used in Building 232.

 

Building 235
Building 235 is a part of the Chemistry and Materials Sciences Directorate known as the Weapons Materials Research and Development Facility. Operations in the facility began in 1987 and have included examination of material structure, surface, and subsurface; precision cutting; ion implanting; and metallurgical studies. Most of the depleted uranium in this building has been used for characterization studies; some has been used for ion beam implantation experiments.

 

Building 241
Building 241 is administered by the Chemistry and Material Sciences Directorate for material properties research and testing as well as study of soil bacteria. The history of the facility included the use of a LINAC.

 

Building 251
Building 251 is the Heavy Element Facility managed by the Safety, Security, and Environmental Protection Directorate as a standby, nonoperational facility in which transuranic isotopes are stored until they can be disposed. One area of the facility has been hardened to resist damage from earthquakes. Room air in the hardened area is exhausted through two high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters; glovebox exhausts are triply HEPA filtered. Exhausts from the unhardened areas are also HEPA filtered and are continuously sampled by sample filter systems.

 

Buildings 253, 254, and 255
Building 253 houses the Hazards Control Department, and the facility includes laboratories for the chemical analysis and counting of radioactive samples. Hazards Control also operates Building 254 to conduct bioassays and provide analytical services and Building 255, which houses a radiation calibration and standards laboratory.

 

Many operations involve the use of sealed sources.

 

Building 281
Building 281 is part of the Energy and Environment Directorate. Tracer work, dissolution studies, and flow studies have been conducted in this building.

 

The Livermore Pool Type Reactor was operated from Building 281 (which was Building 193 before 1966). The reactor operated from 1957 to 1980.

 

Building 282
Building 282 contains residual contamination from past operations.

 

Building 292
Building 292 contains residual contamination from the past operation of a rotating target neutron source. Emissions result from tritium-contaminated water that leaked from an underground storage tank. Vegetation in the area transpires water with elevated tritium concentrations.

 

Building 298
Building 298 is the Fusion Target Fabrication Facility, a part of the Laser Fusion Program. Small amounts of tritium have been used in this facility in conjunction with fusion target research and development.

 
Building 321 Complex
Buildings 321, 321A, 321B, and 321C are the Material Fabrication facility. Operations in this complex include milling, shaping, and machining of depleted uranium. Uranium pieces were worked in single locations or were moved from machine to machine. In addition, depleted uranium parts occasionally underwent heat treatment. The amount of depleted uranium handled depended on programmatic demands and varied from month to month. Machining only occurred in 321C.
 

Building 327
Building 327 is a radiography facility and, along with Building 239, has conducted nondestructive evaluation in support of LLNL Site 300, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Tonopah Test Range, DOE contractor laboratories, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Equipment in these buildings has included lasers, linear accelerators, isotope sources, and flash X-ray equipment (DOE 1992).

 

Building 331
Building 331 is the Hydrogen Research Facility or Tritium Research Facility. The building houses the tritium research facility and associated laboratories. The bulk of the tritium inventory is in elemental form or metal hydrides capable of being turned into elemental form by heating. A small amount of tritium has been used for labeling compounds or synthesizing lithium hydride. There has been no deliberate experimental use of tritiated water. Some tritiated water is formed in the tritium cleanup systems during the removal of tritium from glovebox atmospheres (DOE 1992).

 

Building 332
Building 332 is the Plutonium Facility. Exhausts from glovebox operations and the workplace are triply HEPA filtered. Exhausts are monitored with both continuous filter sampling and plutonium-specific, continuous real-time monitors. The major activities at the facility have included testing plutonium-bearing engineering assemblies, developing and demonstrating improved plutonium fabrication techniques, and fundamental and applied research in plutonium metallurgy.

 

Building 334
Building 334, the Hardened Engineering Test Building, is in the southwest quadrant of the LLNL site and provides laboratory space. This facility performs two main activities. The first is intrinsic radiation
measurements. Nonexplosive, plutonium-bearing assemblies are used in these experiments to determine the occupational radiation exposure to personnel during transportation, storage, and handling of nuclear weapons. The second activity is physical testing of components to various combinations of vibration, acceleration, mechanical and thermal shock, and thermal cycling. These tests simulate the harsh conditions to which the components could be subjected over their lifetime in storage, transportation, and use.

 

Building 341
Building 341 is one of the Lasers Directorate facilities. Experimental studies include the use of high-energy electrical systems, explosives, high-velocity experiments using gun systems, development and testing of optics, laser systems, flash X-ray generators, and hydro-diagnostics equipment.

 

Building 361 Complex
The research complex for the Biology and Biotechnology Research Directorate includes Buildings 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366 and 367. Building 365 contains small amounts of tritium, 14C and 35S used in animal research and incorporated in animal carcasses stored frozen pending disposal. The building air is filtered through at least two HEPA filters and one charcoal filter before being exhausted. Most of the organs that contained radionuclides have been removed from the animals for examination. The radionuclide sources in Building 361 include tritium, 14C, 32P, 33P, and 35S, mostly incorporated as constituent atoms (tracers) in organic compounds.

 

Building 378
Building 378 is part of the Energy and Environment Directorate. Small quantities of radioactive tracers have been handled in this building.

 

Building 391
Building 391 is the Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser Facility. The building contains a master oscillator room and film calibration facility; a laser bay and switchyard; a 10-beam target bay; a Nova 2-beam target bay; and Nova power-conditioning and control systems. Radiation and radioactive materials may be encountered in the form of neutrons, X-rays, and possible contamination of the target chamber with tritium.

 

Building 412
Building 412 is used for environmental research and includes service shops and laboratories in which experiments involving lasers and spectrometers are conducted. Other experiments have involved extremely high temperatures and pressures. The eastern section of the building contains six hot cells that are no longer used. These cells and the associated air filtration and scrubber system are contaminated with low levels of mixed fission products and are in caretaker standby condition with a maintenance and monitoring program (DOE 1992).

 

Building 435
Building 435 houses two magnetic fusion energy experiments: the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, operated by the Physics and Advanced Technology Directorate, and the Davis Diverted Tokamak, operated by the University of California, Davis, Department of Applied Science. Experiments are conducted in these facilities on the confinement and heating of plasmas as part of the U.S. Fusion Energy Program. Plasmas are formed in large vacuum vessels and studied using diagnostics including a laser interferometer and laser Thompson scattering (DOE 2004). This building has also housed the Sherwood Project (magnetic fusion energy experiment) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

 

Building 490 Complex
This complex of buildings in the northern quadrant of the LLNL at the Livermore site includes Buildings 490, 491, 492, 493, and 494. The complex supports operation of the laser demonstration facilities (Buildings 490, 492, and 494) and the separator demonstration facilities (Buildings 490, 491, 493, and 494) as well as related research and development activities. Chemical processing has been performed in Building 494.

 

The operations performed at the 490 Complex supported both the U-AVLIS process for uranium enrichment and waste treatment development activities. In June 1999, USEC suspended further development of the U-AVLIS technology. The Separator Demonstration Facility in Building 490 contained the uranium separator and areas for receipt, inspection, and storage of the separator pod assemblies and parts. Pods were transported for refurbishment from Building 490 to Building 491 through an enclosed transporter equipped with a HEPA filter and an inert gas supply. Building 491 housed the separator pod disassembly area, oxidation ovens, grit blasters, coating equipment, change rooms, a receiving and shipping area for component storage and assembly of sealed containers of natural or depleted uranium and of small quantities of enriched uranium. Building 493 was used for component storage and assembly and for sealed storage of U-AVLIS feed, classified materials, and low-level radioactive wastes. Building 493 stored up to 80,000 kg of uranium at one time.

 

Buildings 513 and 514 Area
Building 513 is operated by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management Division. The Stabilization Unit is a mechanized mixing device used to make homogeneous mixtures of waste. Solidification agents are added during mixing to transfer sludges to solids. The Microfiltration Unit filters out waste radioactive particles. Small quantities of waste materials are sampled, treated, and stored. No releases are assumed to occur from waste storage because the wastes are fully contained.

 

Building 514 and the 514 open area are operated by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management Division. The wastewater treatment tank farm and storage tank area process the liquid waste from facilities on site. The treatment process can involve any of batch chemical treatment consisting of neutralization, flocculation, oxidation, reduction, precipitation, separation, or filtration. Areas used for storage are not considered to release radionuclides because the wastes are fully
contained.

 

Building 612 Area
Building 612 is operated by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management Division. It is a facility where waste has been repackaged for shipment off site. The Building 612 Yard is operated by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management Division. The Yard consists of several areas where containers of radioactive wastes are stacked outdoors. The containers, which are not air tight, can outgas tritium.

 

Building 625
Building 625 is operated by Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management. The building houses the handling and storage of wastes that are not subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, asbestos, and transuranic wastes.

 
Southeast Quadrant (Main Site)
The Southeast Quadrant of the Livermore site has slightly elevated levels of 239Pu in the surface soil and air (presumably from resuspension). The source of the 239Pu was past waste management operations.
 
Site 300
Explosives tests in which radionuclides can be present have been conducted on open-air firing tables. These tests have depleted uranium material as part of the material inventory. There are multiple tests per year. Air activation products are created at the flash X-ray and LINAC. Experiments involving tritium were conducted in the past as well.
 
Throughout its history, Site 300 has included several LINACs and flash X-ray units. These devices
include:

  • XR2 Machine, late 1950s
  • ASTRON LINAC, 1963
  • Electron Test Accelerator, 1983
  • Electron Test Accelerator II, late 1980s

 

Some selected operations at Site 300 are discussed below.

 

Bunker 801
Bunker 801 is the Contained Firing Facility but in the past has been used with open-air firing tables. This facility contained the Flash X-Ray (FXR) LINAC, which began operations in 1982. Workers could have encountered depleted uranium, tritium, and accelerator-produced air activation products.

 

Bunker 851
This facility housed a 100-MeV LINAC. Open-air firing tables were also used. Workers could have encountered depleted uranium, tritium, and accelerator-produced air activation products.

 

Bunker 86
The Advanced Test Accelerator is housed in Bunker 865. Workers are likely to have encountered accelerator-produced air activation products.

 
Nuclear Weapons Testing
LLNL personnel supported a variety of nuclear weapons testing from 1952 through the late 1980s. Specific information about these tests is not provided in the Site Profile. Individual exposure records should include information for personnel who traveled to the Nevada Test Site, Pacific Proving Ground, or other nuclear weapons testing locations (Alaska, Colorado, New Mexico, and Mississippi). These records should include external dosimetry results as well as any bioassay that might have been performed.
 

For external dose, LLNL employees working at the NTS may have been double badged, wearing dosimetry from both the NTS and LLNL. For other nuclear weapons tests, only LLNL dosimetry was provided. For internal dose, LLNL might have performed bioassay upon a worker’s return to LLNL.

 

The Building 222 Complex in the southwest quadrant of the LLNL at the Livermore site consists of nine buildings (221 through 229) and several trailers. The complex includes chemical laboratories, offices, and machining and storage facilities. The wide range of work performed here includes the bench-scale synthesis and testing of chemical compounds, intralaboratory and consulting services, chemical analysis, bench-scale polymers and composite technology development, and other special
bench-scale research and development projects (DOE 1992).

 

The chemistry facility, Building 222, is the main facility for the study of analytical and physical chemistry at LLNL. Buildings 224 and 226 are used for environmental analytical work. Building 225 activities have included energy research, surface science, and other similar bench-scale research. Building 227 has provided a facility for polymer research and work associated with LLNL intelligence and treaty verification support. Building 228 is the waste retention system for Building 226.
Building 229 has stored beryllium hydride.

 

The hazards associated with the Building 222 Complex include handling small quantities of hazardous materials involved in research and development activities. These include radioactive materials, laser dyes, high explosives, solvents, inorganic acids, bases and salts, organic compounds, halogens, organometallics, and inorganic compounds (DOE 1992).

 

Building 231
The Development and Assembly Facility, Building 231, is a large experimental, manufacturing, assembly, test, and materials-handling facility in the southwestern quadrant of the site. Building 231 houses research and development activities conducted by Chemistry and Materials Science (Materials Division), Engineering (Engineering Sciences, Materials Fabrication, Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Test Engineering, and Weapons Engineering Divisions), Safeguards and Security (Materials Management Division), and Special Projects Program (J Division). Management oversight for Building 231 is provided by the Engineering Directorate through Engineering Sciences Division. Small amounts of depleted uranium have been used in Building 232.

 

Building 235
Building 235 is a part of the Chemistry and Materials Sciences Directorate known as the Weapons Materials Research and Development Facility. Operations in the facility began in 1987 and have included examination of material structure, surface, and subsurface; precision cutting; ion implanting; and metallurgical studies. Most of the depleted uranium in this building has been used for characterization studies; some has been used for ion beam implantation experiments.

 

Building 241
Building 241 is administered by the Chemistry and Material Sciences Directorate for material properties research and testing as well as study of soil bacteria. The history of the facility included the use of a LINAC.

 

Building 251
Building 251 is the Heavy Element Facility managed by the Safety, Security, and Environmental Protection Directorate as a standby, nonoperational facility in which transuranic isotopes are stored until they can be disposed. One area of the facility has been hardened to resist damage from earthquakes. Room air in the hardened area is exhausted through two high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters; glovebox exhausts are triply HEPA filtered. Exhausts from the unhardened areas are also HEPA filtered and are continuously sampled by sample filter systems.

 

Buildings 253, 254, and 255
Building 253 houses the Hazards Control Department, and the facility includes laboratories for the chemical analysis and counting of radioactive samples. Hazards Control also operates Building 254 to conduct bioassays and provide analytical services and Building 255, which houses a radiation calibration and standards laboratory.

 

Many operations involve the use of sealed sources.

 

Building 281
Building 281 is part of the Energy and Environment Directorate. Tracer work, dissolution studies, and flow studies have been conducted in this building.

 

The Livermore Pool Type Reactor was operated from Building 281 (which was Building 193 before 1966). The reactor operated from 1957 to 1980.

 

Building 282
Building 282 contains residual contamination from past operations.

 

Building 292
Building 292 contains residual contamination from the past operation of a rotating target neutron source. Emissions result from tritium-contaminated water that leaked from an underground storage tank. Vegetation in the area transpires water with elevated tritium concentrations.

 

Building 298
Building 298 is the Fusion Target Fabrication Facility, a part of the Laser Fusion Program. Small amounts of tritium have been used in this facility in conjunction with fusion target research and development.

 
Building 321 Complex
Buildings 321, 321A, 321B, and 321C are the Material Fabrication facility. Operations in this complex include milling, shaping, and machining of depleted uranium. Uranium pieces were worked in single locations or were moved from machine to machine. In addition, depleted uranium parts occasionally underwent heat treatment. The amount of depleted uranium handled depended on programmatic demands and varied from month to month. Machining only occurred in 321C.
 

Building 327
Building 327 is a radiography facility and, along with Building 239, has conducted nondestructive evaluation in support of LLNL Site 300, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Tonopah Test Range, DOE contractor laboratories, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Equipment in these buildings has included lasers, linear accelerators, isotope sources, and flash X-ray equipment (DOE 1992).

 

Building 331
Building 331 is the Hydrogen Research Facility or Tritium Research Facility. The building houses the tritium research facility and associated laboratories. The bulk of the tritium inventory is in elemental form or metal hydrides capable of being turned into elemental form by heating. A small amount of tritium has been used for labeling compounds or synthesizing lithium hydride. There has been no deliberate experimental use of tritiated water. Some tritiated water is formed in the tritium cleanup systems during the removal of tritium from glovebox atmospheres (DOE 1992).

 

Building 332
Building 332 is the Plutonium Facility. Exhausts from glovebox operations and the workplace are triply HEPA filtered. Exhausts are monitored with both continuous filter sampling and plutonium-specific, continuous real-time monitors. The major activities at the facility have included testing plutonium-bearing engineering assemblies, developing and demonstrating improved plutonium fabrication techniques, and fundamental and applied research in plutonium metallurgy.

 

Building 334
Building 334, the Hardened Engineering Test Building, is in the southwest quadrant of the LLNL site and provides laboratory space. This facility performs two main activities. The first is intrinsic radiation measurements. Nonexplosive, plutonium-bearing assemblies are used in these experiments to determine the occupational radiation exposure to personnel during transportation, storage, and handling of nuclear weapons. The second activity is physical testing of components to various combinations of vibration, acceleration, mechanical and thermal shock, and thermal cycling. These tests simulate the harsh conditions to which the components could be subjected over their lifetime in storage, transportation, and use.

 

Building 341
Building 341 is one of the Lasers Directorate facilities. Experimental studies include the use of high-energy electrical systems, explosives, high-velocity experiments using gun systems, development and testing of optics, laser systems, flash X-ray generators, and hydro-diagnostics equipment.

 

Building 361 Complex
The research complex for the Biology and Biotechnology Research Directorate includes Buildings 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366 and 367. Building 365 contains small amounts of tritium, 14C and 35S used in animal research and incorporated in animal carcasses stored frozen pending disposal. The building air is filtered through at least two HEPA filters and one charcoal filter before being exhausted. Most of the organs that contained radionuclides have been removed from the animals for examination. The radionuclide sources in Building 361 include tritium, 14C, 32P, 33P, and 35S, mostly incorporated as constituent atoms (tracers) in organic compounds.

 

Building 378
Building 378 is part of the Energy and Environment Directorate. Small quantities of radioactive tracers have been handled in this building.

 

Building 391
Building 391 is the Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser Facility. The building contains a master oscillator room and film calibration facility; a laser bay and switchyard; a 10-beam target bay; a Nova 2-beam target bay; and Nova power-conditioning and control systems. Radiation and radioactive materials may be encountered in the form of neutrons, X-rays, and possible contamination of the target chamber with tritium.

 

Building 412
Building 412 is used for environmental research and includes service shops and laboratories in which experiments involving lasers and spectrometers are conducted. Other experiments have involved extremely high temperatures and pressures. The eastern section of the building contains six hot cells that are no longer used. These cells and the associated air filtration and scrubber system are contaminated with low levels of mixed fission products and are in caretaker standby condition with a maintenance and monitoring program (DOE 1992).

 

Building 435
Building 435 houses two magnetic fusion energy experiments: the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, operated by the Physics and Advanced Technology Directorate, and the Davis Diverted Tokamak, operated by the University of California, Davis, Department of Applied Science. Experiments are conducted in these facilities on the confinement and heating of plasmas as part of the U.S. Fusion Energy Program. Plasmas are formed in large vacuum vessels and studied using diagnostics including a laser interferometer and laser Thompson scattering (DOE 2004). This building has also housed the Sherwood Project (magnetic fusion energy experiment) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

 

Building 490 Complex
This complex of buildings in the northern quadrant of the LLNL at the Livermore site includes Buildings 490, 491, 492, 493, and 494. The complex supports operation of the laser demonstration facilities (Buildings 490, 492, and 494) and the separator demonstration facilities (Buildings 490, 491, 493, and 494) as well as related research and development activities. Chemical processing has been performed in Building 494.

 

The operations performed at the 490 Complex supported both the U-AVLIS process for uranium enrichment and waste treatment development activities. In June 1999, USEC suspended further development of the U-AVLIS technology. The Separator Demonstration Facility in Building 490 contained the uranium separator and areas for receipt, inspection, and storage of the separator pod assemblies and parts. Pods were transported for refurbishment from Building 490 to Building 491 through an enclosed transporter equipped with a HEPA filter and an inert gas supply. Building 491 housed the separator pod disassembly area, oxidation ovens, grit blasters, coating equipment, change rooms, a receiving and shipping area for component storage and assembly of sealed containers of natural or depleted uranium and of small quantities of enriched uranium. Building 493 was used for component storage and assembly and for sealed storage of U-AVLIS feed, classified materials, and low-level radioactive wastes. Building 493 stored up to 80,000 kg of uranium at one time.

 

Buildings 513 and 514 Area
Building 513 is operated by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management Division. The Stabilization Unit is a mechanized mixing device used to make homogeneous mixtures of waste. Solidification agents are added during mixing to transfer sludges to solids. The Microfiltration Unit filters out waste radioactive particles. Small quantities of waste materials are sampled, treated, and stored. No releases are assumed to occur from waste storage because the wastes are fully contained.

 

Building 514 and the 514 open area are operated by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management Division. The wastewater treatment tank farm and storage tank area process the liquid waste from facilities on site. The treatment process can involve any of batch chemical treatment consisting of neutralization, flocculation, oxidation, reduction, precipitation, separation, or filtration. Areas used for storage are not considered to release radionuclides because the wastes are fully contained.

 

Building 612 Area
Building 612 is operated by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management Division. It is a facility where waste has been repackaged for shipment off site. The Building 612 Yard is operated by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management Division. The Yard consists of several areas where containers of radioactive wastes are stacked outdoors. The containers, which are not air tight, can outgas tritium.

 

Building 625
Building 625 is operated by Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management. The building houses the handling and storage of wastes that are not subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, asbestos, and transuranic wastes.

 
Southeast Quadrant (Main Site)
The Southeast Quadrant of the Livermore site has slightly elevated levels of 239Pu in the surface soil and air (presumably from resuspension). The source of the 239Pu was past waste management operations.
 
Site 300
Explosives tests in which radionuclides can be present have been conducted on open-air firing tables. These tests have depleted uranium material as part of the material inventory. There are multiple tests per year. Air activation products are created at the flash X-ray and LINAC. Experiments involving tritium were conducted in the past as well. Throughout its history, Site 300 has included several LINACs and flash X-ray units. These devices include:

  • XR2 Machine, late 1950s
  • ASTRON LINAC, 1963
  • Electron Test Accelerator, 1983
  • Electron Test Accelerator II, late 1980s

Some selected operations at Site 300 are discussed below.

 

Bunker 801
Bunker 801 is the Contained Firing Facility but in the past has been used with open-air firing tables. This facility contained the Flash X-Ray (FXR) LINAC, which began operations in 1982. Workers could have encountered depleted uranium, tritium, and accelerator-produced air activation products.

 

Bunker 851
This facility housed a 100-MeV LINAC. Open-air firing tables were also used. Workers could have encountered depleted uranium, tritium, and accelerator-produced air activation products.

 

Bunker 86
The Advanced Test Accelerator is housed in Bunker 865. Workers are likely to have encountered accelerator produced air activation products.

 
Nuclear Weapons Testing
LLNL personnel supported a variety of nuclear weapons testing from 1952 through the late 1980s. Specific information about these tests is not provided in the Site Profile. Individual exposure records should include information for personnel who traveled to the Nevada Test Site, Pacific Proving Ground, or other nuclear weapons testing locations (Alaska, Colorado, New Mexico, and Mississippi). These records should include external dosimetry results as well as any bioassay that might have been performed.
 

For external dose, LLNL employees working at the NTS may have been double badged, wearing dosimetry from both the NTS and LLNL. For other nuclear weapons tests, only LLNL dosimetry was provided. For internal dose, LLNL might have performed bioassay upon a worker’s return to LLNL.

 
DOCUMENTS:
 
NIOSH Special Exposure Cohort Petition Evaluation Reports
Petition 92 (Jan 1, 1950, to Dec 31, 1973)
SEC Petition Evaluation Report, Petition SEC-00092, Report Rev #: 0
Report Submittal Date: December 3, 2007

 
Petition 163 (Jan 1, 1950 to Dec 31, 1973)
SEC Petition Evaluation Report, Petition SEC-00163, Report Rev #: 0
Report Submittal Date: January 21, 2010

 
Petition 221 (Jan 1, 1974, to Dec 31, 1995)
SEC Petition Evaluation Report, Petition SEC-00221, Report Rev Number: 0
Report Submittal Date: February 12, 2016

 
Technical Basis Documents
Site Profile
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory – Introduction
Effective Date: 09/12/2005, Revision: 00 PC-1

 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory – Site Description
Effective Date: 10/26/2005, Revision: 00 PC-1

 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory – Occupational Medical Dose
Effective Date: 08/27/2010, Revision: 01

 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory – Occupational Environmental Dose
Effective Date: 03/16/2010, Revision: 01

 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory – Occupational Internal Dose
Effective Date: 08/12/2016, Revision: 03

 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory – Occupational External Dose
Effective Date: 02/26/2010, Revision: 02